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Need of education system driven by PPPs, for global competitiveness! By Kashif Mirza

Byadmin

Mar 7, 2024

The writer is an

economist, anchor,

analyst and the

President of All

 Pakistan Private

Schools’ Federation

president@Pakistan

privateschools.com

In today’s rapidly changing world, ensuring a high-quality and inclusive education system is crucial for sustainable development. There’s a need of education system has rapidly evolved, driven by PPPs that emphasize global competitiveness. The significance of education cannot be overstated for nations like Pakistan, ensuring a high-quality and inclusive education system is crucial. One avenue to achieve this is through the promotion of Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) in school education. We must explore the potential benefits of PPPs in Pakistan, from global experiences to provide a comprehensive guide for policymakers and stakeholders. Public-Private Partnerships involve collaboration between government entities and private organizations to deliver public services. In the realm of education, this collaboration can enhance the quality and accessibility of schooling, leveraging the strengths of both sectors. As the Federal Secretary of Education, Mr. Waseem Ajmal Chaudhary plays a crucial role in shaping policies and strategies that bridge the gap between the public and private sectors, fostering educational excellence across the country. Chaudhary’s tenure has seen the development of comprehensive policy frameworks that outline the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of both public and private entities in the education sector. Mr. Waseem’s tenure has seen the development of comprehensive policy frameworks that outline the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of both public and private entities in the education sector, and his role in promoting Public-Private Partnerships for school education in Pakistan is instrumental. While addressing the challenges and future outlook, there is a need of continuous significant progress by adapting to the evolving educational landscape and addressing potential hurdles in the implementation of PPPs requires ongoing dedication and collaboration. Pakistan, a country with immense potential, faces a critical challenge in its education sector – the presence of 26 million out-of-school children. Pakistan is facing a serious challenge to ensure all children, particularly the most disadvantaged, attend, stay and learn in school. Currently, Pakistan has the world’s highest number of out-of-school children (OOSC) with an estimated 26 million children aged 5-16 not attending school, representing 37 per cent of the total population in this age group. Of these, the public schooling system only caters to 24 million and private schooling system caters to 26.9 million, with over 26 million currently out-of-school-children (OOSC). As per All Pakistan Private Schools Federation‘s  data and Pakistan Education Statistics 2020-21, private educational institutions are serving sizeable number of students (56%) with 26.9 million students, 1.5 million teachers and 207,000 private schools. We need more than 200,000 schools with 2 million new teachers, to cater over 26 million currently out-of-school-children (OOSC). This dire situation threatens the nation’s socio-economic development, perpetuates inequality, and hampers progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals. The Article 25-A of the Constitution of Islamic Republic of Pakistan safeguard the Right of Education of children age 5-16 years. After devolution under 18th Constitutional Amendment, the Provincial Assemblies also enacted the Article 25-A to ensure free and compulsory education to all children and approved Compulsory Education Acts. Pakistan is also signatory of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which reiterates Pakistan’s pledge to mainstream out-of-school-children (OOSC) by the year 2030. This legal provision in the constitution of Pakistan and international commitment shows a strong determination to address the challenge of OOSC. PPPs can expand access to education, particularly in underserved areas. By partnering with private entities, the government can extend its reach, ensuring that quality education reaches every corner of the country. 

Pakistan needs more than 200,000 new schools with 2 million new teachers to cater over 26 million currently out-of-school-children (OOSC). By such an education model driven by Public-Private Partnership in School Education focus on infrastructure development, teacher training and curriculum improvement, so we can fulfil the required educational gap and can be able to compete for global competitiveness!

In the pursuit of educational excellence, attention must be drawn to the insights from successful global PPP models. By studying approaches in countries like the US, United Kingdom, Australia, China, Sweden, Russia and India etc, and tailored strategies must be designed that align with Pakistan’s unique educational landscape. In the dynamic landscape of educational reforms in Pakistan, we must stands for a pivotal strategy with spearheading efforts to forge impactful Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) especially for school education. Clear guidelines are essential for the effective implementation and success of PPP initiatives. By resource mobilization, PPPs attract private investment, allowing for improved infrastructure, technology, and teacher training. This can address critical resource gaps in public schools and uplift the overall educational environment. Private entities often bring innovative approaches and management techniques, fostering a culture of efficiency and responsiveness. This can lead to improved teaching methodologies and a more dynamic educational experience for students. To glean insights for the Pakistani context, it is essential to examine successful PPP models globally. Countries like the US, United Kingdom, China, Australia, Sweden, Germany, Russia and India have implemented effective PPPs in education, showcasing diverse strategies and outcomes. The United States has successfully leveraged PPPs to enhance educational outcomes. With a focus on technology integration and industry collaboration, the American model emphasizes the role of education as a key economic driver. Notable partnerships with tech giants and corporate entities have contributed to innovation and workforce readiness. The UK’s Academy School model demonstrates the successful collaboration between the government and private sponsors. It has led to improved student performance, increased parental involvement, and greater accountability. Australia’s approach emphasizes tailored solutions to accommodate the diverse needs of its population. A range of PPP models, including school autonomy and community engagement, have allowed for flexibility in addressing unique challenges. Robust data collection and continuous evaluation ensure the effectiveness of these partnerships. China’s education system has rapidly evolved, driven by PPPs that emphasize global competitiveness. The country has attracted private investment, especially in cutting-edge technology and infrastructure. The strategic alignment between educational goals and economic growth positions China as a global leader in educational innovation. Germany’s success lies in its integration of vocational training within PPPs. Strong collaboration between the government, private sector, and vocational institutions has created a skilled workforce, addressing the needs of the labor market effectively. This holistic approach serves as a valuable lesson for Pakistan in aligning education with industry requirements. Sweden’s education voucher system allows parents to choose private schools, fostering healthy competition and incentivizing schools to deliver high-quality education. India’s Public-Private Partnership in School Education program focuses on infrastructure development, teacher training, and curriculum improvement. Russia’s experience showcases government-driven PPPs aimed at ensuring educational equity. Emphasis on infrastructure development, teacher training, and curriculum improvement has resulted in improved access to quality education across diverse regions. This model aligns with Pakistan’s goal of inclusive educational growth. India’s Public-Private Partnership in School Education program focuses on infrastructure development, which has shown success in enhancing education quality and access, particularly in rural areas. These all models also have shown success in enhancing education quality and access, particularly in rural areas. By the adaptation of best practices and global insights informing strategies, we can adapt successful practices from global models, incorporating elements that align with Pakistan’s socio-economic and cultural context. This adaptive approach ensures that PPP initiatives are tailored to meet the specific needs of Pakistani schools by  continuous learning and improvement. We must be emphasized a culture of continuous learning and improvement, leveraging international experiences to refine and enhance PPP strategies, to adaptability positions Pakistani schools on a trajectory towards sustained educational excellence.

Pakistan needs to develop a robust policy framework that outlines the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of both public and private partners. Through strategic policy formulation, incentive structures, and a commitment to global insights, we must laid down the groundwork for a transformative era in Pakistani education, where collaboration between the public and private sectors is a catalyst for lasting educational excellence. Clarity in guidelines ensures effective implementation and accountability. Efforts must be made to create attractive incentives for private investment in education. Financial incentives, tax breaks, and other measures must be implemented to encourage reputable private organizations to actively participate in improving the quality of education. The private entrepreneurs and individuals should be encouraged and given incentives to open new schools and adopt schools for infrastructure development and provision of necessary facilities. The incentives could be in the shape of tax amenities and rebates or attribution of private schools for at least 10-year. In order to utilize the important sub-sector of education i.e. Deeni Madaris, the Government in consultation with their representatives should devise a programme for imparting formal education. The work of National Commission for Human Development (NCHD) and Basic Education Community School (BECS) for promoting literacy and enrolling out of school children has been noteworthy in the past. A merit based management with enhanced funding 50% annually should be expanded the network, to meet the requirement. Public-private funding partnership has led to a significant rise in education spending per student. Government-backed PPPs show a correlation with increased educational expenditure. These all models not only Improved standardized test scores but also graduation rates in schools with PPP initiatives. Positive correlation between PPPs and student achievement, measured through standardized assessments. It’s also enhanced performance in international assessments, reflecting the impact of PPPs on educational quality. Recognizing the importance of community involvement, initiatives to engage parents and local communities must be taken in the education process. By fostering a sense of ownership and accountability at the grassroots level, PPPs are more likely to succeed in their mission of providing quality education for all. This will attract reputable private entities and contribute to the sustainability of PPP initiatives. Foster community involvement and awareness to ensure the acceptance and success of PPPs. Engaging parents and local communities creates a sense of ownership and accountability for the quality of education. Promoting Public-Private Partnerships in school education is a strategic move for Pakistan to address its educational challenges. By drawing inspiration from successful global models and tailoring them to local needs, the country can pave the way for a brighter and more inclusive future through enhanced educational opportunities for all.

As Pakistan charts its course towards educational excellence through PPPs, the comparative analysis with the USA, UK, Australia, China, Germany, Russia and India provides valuable insights. Tailoring strategies to the unique socio-economic landscape, while incorporating successful elements from these global models, positions Pakistan to build a robust and effective PPP framework for the advancement of its schools and the empowerment of its students. These all models promote innovation and choice within the education landscape. With strong focus on practical skills in vocational training results in high employability rates. Reduction in educational disparities and improved academic outcomes in regions made possible with PPP interventions. A clear and sustainable policy of incentives must be adopted for private investment to provide financial incentives and tax breaks to encourage private investment in education. Pakistan needs more than 200,000 new schools with 2 million new teachers to cater over 26 million currently out-of-school-children (OOSC). By such an education model driven by Public-Private Partnership in School Education focus on infrastructure development, teacher training and curriculum improvement, so we can fulfil the required educational gap and can be able to compete for global competitiveness!

By admin

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